THIS DAY IN HISTORY

Friday, September 01, 2017

September 2 (A Triple)

31 B.C. - The Battle of Actium: Octavian defeated Marc Antony.

Actium is one of the most important battles in history, because Octavian (later Augustus) finished off any resistance he had in the Roman world, and soon put an end to the Roman Republic - establishing the Roman Empire.

1945 - Japan signed an unconditional surrender aboard the U.S. battleship Missouri in Tokyo Bay, formally ending World War II.

"We are gathered here, representatives of the major warring powers - to conclude a solemn agreement whereby peace may be restored. The issues involving divergent ideals and ideologies, have been determined on the battlefields of the world and hence are not for our discussion or debate. Nor is it for us here to meet, representing as we do a majority of the people of the earth, in a spirit of distrust, malice or hatred. But rather it is for us, both victors and vanquished, to rise to that higher dignity which alone befits the sacred purposes we are about to serve, committing all our people unreservedly to faithful compliance with the obligation they are here formally to assume.

It is my earnest hope and indeed the hope of all mankind that from this solemn occasion a better world shall emerge out of the blood and carnage of the past - a world founded upon faith and understanding - a world dedicated to the dignity of man and the fulfillment of his most cherished wish - for freedom, tolerance and justice.

The terms and conditions upon which the surrender of the Japanese Imperial Forces is here to be given and accepted are contained in the Instrument of Surrender now before you.

As Supreme Commander for the Allied Powers, I announce it my firm purpose, in the tradition of the countries I represent, to proceed in the discharge of my responsibilities with justice and tolerance, while taking all necessary dispositions to insure that the terms of surrender are fully, promptly and faithfully complied with.

Let us pray that peace be now restored to the world and that God will preserve it always. These proceedings are closed." - Gen. Douglas MacArthur

1945 - Ho Chi Minh broke ties with France and declared Vietnam an independent republic.

WWII ended, and in a round-about-way, the first fight of the Cold War began...Such is the cruel reality of human history.

490 B.C. - Phidippides ran the first 'marathon,' seeking aid from Sparta against Persia.

Phidippides didn’t run a 'marathon.'  He was running to Sparta to ask for their help at the Battle of Marathon.

He ran in vain, however, because the Spartans left the Athenians to fend for themselves...And they did just fine, to the great shock and shame of the Spartans.


44 B.C. - Cicero delivered his 'First Philippic,' an attack on Mark Antony, in the Roman Senate.

Cicero was a brilliant orator and politician, but an even better survivor, because he recognized very early that Octavian would be the eventual successor to Caesar.

Make no mistake, however, Cicero was no ally of Octavian’s, and was soon taking shots at the Emperor as well.


1192 - The Treaty of Jaffa put an end to hostilities of the Third Crusade. Negotiated between Richard the Lion Heart and Saladin, Christian pilgrims were granted special rights of travel around Palestine and in Jerusalem.

Richard and Saladin may have 'ended hostilities' but the Crusades were anything but over.


1666 - The Great Fire of London began.

Much of the city went up in flames, including 13,000 houses...Amazingly, only around a dozen people died in the fire.

On a positive note, the fire played a large role in stopping the spread of the Black Plague in London.


1752 - Britain adopted the Gregorian calendar.

Most of Europe made this change 150-years earlier...Which is one of the many reasons historical dates are often convoluted and confusing.


1777 – The Battle of Cooch's Bridge, N.J.:  U.S. Revolutionary War.

This was a small, inconclusive battle, which would normally go unrecognized here...But it is important for one reason: It was the first battle where the new nation used the 'Stars and Stripes Flag' in battle.


1901 - U.S. Vice President Theodore Roosevelt offered the advice, "Speak softly and carry a big stick," in a speech at the Minnesota State Fair.

This was a great quote, and one we should always live up to...That said, it’s important to understand there is no use in “carrying” any size stick if you don’t swing it when necessary.


1929 - An opera, composed by Kurt Weill with a libretto by Berthold Brecht, was in its final minutes when Brecht's wife launched into a speech for communism from the stage.

Sounds just like the current set of thespian idiots we have...Some things never change.


1963 - Alabama Governor George C. Wallace prevented the integration of Tuskegee High School by encircling the building with state troopers.

”In Birmingham they love the governor…” - Lynard Skynard.

They probably still love Gov. Wallace, who was a Democrat by the way.


1995 - At a military cemetery on a hill high above Honolulu, President Bill Clinton marked the 50th anniversary of the end of World War II, saying it taught Americans that "the blessings of freedom are never easy or free."

Clinton was 100% correct!! It’s too bad he and his Liberal pals don’t believe a word of what he said, though...But what else is new from the world's greatest shit salesman, who is constantly tossing out 'samples.'

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